Works great against most of demons! Must be prepared on the night of Waxing moon when ingredienst should be gathered too, atleast the same day. You will nead: - mandrake root, 3 pinch-es - salt 1 teaspoon - Holly water 3 tablespoon - Holy thistle... Read more of Potion against Demons at White Magic.caInformational Site Network Informational
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A Cold Greeting
This is a story told by the late Benson Foley of Sa...

The Ghost Seen By Lord Brougham
It is comparatively easy, when seated before a roarin...

The Vision And The Portrait
Mrs. M. writes (December 15, 1891) that before her visi...

The Ghostly Warriors Of Worms
The abbot of Ursperg, in his Chronicle, year 1123,...

The Top Attic In Pringle's Mansion Edinburgh
A charming lady, Miss South, informs me that no house...

The Knot In The Shutter
"It is said that a dream produced a powerful effect on ...

The Dead Valley
I have a friend, Olof Ehrensvaerd, a Swede by birth, ...

The Marquis De Rambouillet
The Marquis de Rambouillet, eldest brother of the ...

The Dwarf Hunters
The heavy summer in the South is particularly hard to...

Farm Barn 2 Floor Plan
INTERIOR ARRANGEMENT. Entering the large door, (a,) ...





Farm House Design Iv






This is perhaps a more ambitious house than either of the preceding, although it may be adapted to a domain of the same extent and value. It is plain and unpretending in appearance; yet, in its ample finish, and deeply drawn, sheltering eaves, broad veranda, and spacious out-buildings, may give accommodation to a larger family indulging a more liberal style of living than the last.

By an error in the engraving, the main roof of the house is made to appear like a double, or gambrel-roof, breaking at the intersection of the gable, or hanging roof over the ends. This is not so intended. The roofs on each side are a straight line of rafters. The Swiss, or hanging style of gable-roof is designed to give a more sheltered effect to the elevation than to run the end walls to a peak in the point of the roof.

By a defect in the drawing, the roof of the veranda is not sufficiently thrown over the columns. This roof should project at least one foot beyond them, so as to perfectly shelter the mouldings beneath from the weather, and conform to the style of the main roof of the house.

The material of which it is built may be of either stone, brick, or wood, as the taste or convenience of the proprietor may suggest. The main building is 44×36 feet, on the ground. The cellar wall may show 117 18 to 24 inches above the ground, and be pierced by windows in each end, as shown in the plan. The height of the main walls may be two full stories below the roof plates, or the chambers may run a foot or two into the garret, at the choice of the builder, either of which arrangements may be permitted.

The front door opens from a veranda 28 feet long by 10 feet in depth, dropping eight inches from the door-sill. This veranda has a hipped roof, which juts over the columns in due proportion with the roof of the house over its walls. These columns are plain, with brackets, or braces from near their tops, sustaining the plate and finish of the roof above, which may be covered either with tin or zinc, painted, or closely shingled.

The walls of the house may be 18 to 20 feet high below the plates; the roof a pitch of 30 to 45°, which will afford an upper garret, or store, or small sleeping rooms, if required; and the eaves should project two to three feet, as climate may demand, over the walls. A plain finish—that is, ceiled underneath—is shown in the design, but brackets on the ends of the rafters, beaded and finished, may be shown, if preferred. The gables are Swiss-roofed, or truncated, thus giving them a most sheltered and comfortable appearance, particularly in a northerly climate. The small gable in front relieves the roof of its monotony, and affords light to the central garret. The chimneys are carried out with partition flues, and may be topped with square caps, as necessity or taste may demand.

Retreating three feet from the kitchen side of the 118 house runs, at right angles, a wing 30×18 feet, one and a half stories high, with a veranda eight feet wide in front. Next in rear of this, continues a wood-house, 30×18 feet, one story high, with ten feet posts, and open in front, the ground level of which is 18 inches below the floor of the wing to which it is attached. The roof of these two is of like character with that of the main building.

Adjoining this wood-house, and at right angles with it, is a building 68×18 feet, projecting two feet outside the line of wood-house and kitchen. This building is one and a half stories high, with 12 feet posts, and roof in the same style and of equal pitch as the others.





Next: Farm House 4 Interior Arrangement

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