"Speakin' of fertile soil," said the Kansan, when the others had had their say, "I never saw a place where melons growed like they used to out in my part of the country. The first season I planted 'em I thought my fortune was sure made. Howev... Read more of HYPERBOLE at Free Jokes.caInformational Site Network Informational
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The Radiant Boy Of Corby Castle
The haunted room forms part of the old house, with...

Farm House 2 Interior Arrangement
The front door of this house opens into a small entry o...

Farm House Design Vi
A Southern or Plantation House.—The proprietor of a pla...

The Dog O' Mause
Account of an apparition that appeared to William Souta...

The Tale Of The Three Antiquaries
Thomas Turnbull stood beside his spade and gazed rapt...

The Assyrian Priest
Herr H. V. Hilprecht is Professor of Assyriology in the...

Lord St Vincent's Ghost Story
Sir Walter Scott, writing about the disturbances in the...


...

Teig O'kane And The Corpse
There was once a grown-up lad in the County Leit...

No 252 Rue M Le Prince
When in May, 1886, I found myself at last in Paris, I...





Farm House 4 Tree-planting In The Highway






This is frequently recommended by writers on country embellishment, as indispensable to a finished decoration of the farm. Such may, or may not be the fact. Trees shade the roads, when planted on their sides, and so they partially do the fields adjoining, making the first muddy, in bad weather, by preventing the sun drying them, and shading the crops of the last by their overhanging foliage, in the season of their growth. Thus they are an evil, in moist and heavy soils. Yet, in light soils, their shade is grateful to the highway traveler, and not, perhaps, injurious to the crops of the adjoining field; and when of proper kinds, they add grace and beauty to the domain in which they stand. 130 We do not, therefore, indiscriminately recommend them, but leave it to the discretion of the farmer, to decide for himself, having seen estates equally pleasant with, and without trees on the roadside. Nothing, however, can be more beautiful than a clump of trees in a pasture-ground, with a herd, or a flock beneath them, near the road; or the grand and overshadowing branches of stately tree, in a rich meadow, leaning, perhaps, over the highway fence, or flourishing in its solitary grandeur, in the distance—each, and all, imposing features in the rural landscape. All such should be preserved, with the greatest care and solicitude, as among the highest and most attractive ornaments which the farm can boast.





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