Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 

Home Ghost Stories Categories Authors Books Search

Ghost Stories

Farm House 7 Fruit Garden—orchards
As the fruit garden and orchards are usually near appen...

The Ghost-ship
BY RICHARD MIDDLETON Fairfield is a little village...

To The God Nibib, Child
...

The Old Nurse's Story
I set out one evening for the cottage of my old ...

Concerning The Murder Of Sergeant Davies
There is at present living in the neighbourhood of --- ...

Dr Funk Sees The Spirit Of Beecher
(New York _Herald_, April 4, 1903) While he will not...

The Silent Woman
The uproarious merriment of a wedding-feast burst ...

The Power Of The Dead To Return To Earth
Though there is no period at which the ancients do no...

Home Embellishments
A discussion of the objects by way of embellishment, wh...

The Haunting Of The Wesleys
The Rev. Samuel Wesley is chiefly known to posterity ...





Farm House 4 Tree-planting In The Highway






This is frequently recommended by writers on country embellishment, as indispensable to a finished decoration of the farm. Such may, or may not be the fact. Trees shade the roads, when planted on their sides, and so they partially do the fields adjoining, making the first muddy, in bad weather, by preventing the sun drying them, and shading the crops of the last by their overhanging foliage, in the season of their growth. Thus they are an evil, in moist and heavy soils. Yet, in light soils, their shade is grateful to the highway traveler, and not, perhaps, injurious to the crops of the adjoining field; and when of proper kinds, they add grace and beauty to the domain in which they stand. 130 We do not, therefore, indiscriminately recommend them, but leave it to the discretion of the farmer, to decide for himself, having seen estates equally pleasant with, and without trees on the roadside. Nothing, however, can be more beautiful than a clump of trees in a pasture-ground, with a herd, or a flock beneath them, near the road; or the grand and overshadowing branches of stately tree, in a rich meadow, leaning, perhaps, over the highway fence, or flourishing in its solitary grandeur, in the distance—each, and all, imposing features in the rural landscape. All such should be preserved, with the greatest care and solicitude, as among the highest and most attractive ornaments which the farm can boast.





Next: Farm House Design V

Previous: Farm House 4 Surrounding Plantations Shrubbery Walks Etc



Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
ADD TO EBOOK