Once there was a gentleman who married for his second wife the proudest and most haughty woman that was ever seen. She had by a former husband two daughters of her own humor, who were, indeed, exactly like her in all things. He had likew... Read more of CINDERELLA OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER. at Children Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
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What Was It?
FITZ-JAMES O'BRIEN It is, I confess, with consider...

The Vision And The Portrait
Mrs. M. writes (December 15, 1891) that before her visi...

The Spook Of Diamond Island
(St. Louis _Globe-Democrat_, Sept. 18, 1888) HARDEN,...

Sertorius And His Hind
So soone as Sertorius arriued from Africa, he stra...

The Withered Arm
THOMAS HARDY A Lorn Milkmaid It was an eighty-c...

The Somersetshire Demoniac
On the 13th of June 1788, George Lukins, of Yatton, i...

The Wood Of The Dead
One summer, in my wanderings with a knapsack, I was a...

The Cock-lane Ghost
About the middle of January 1762, a gentleman was sen...

Count Magnus
By what means the papers out of which I have made a con...

Farm House 6 Chamber Plan
The main flight of stairs in the entrance hall leads on...





Peter's Ghost






A naval officer visited a friend in the country. Several men were
sitting round the smoking-room fire when he arrived, and a fox-terrier
was with them. Presently the heavy, shambling footsteps of an old
dog, and the metallic shaking sound of his collar, were heard coming
up stairs.

"Here's old Peter!" said his visitor.

"_Peter's dead_!" whispered his owner.

The sounds passed through the closed door, heard by all; they pattered
into the room; the fox-terrier bristled up, growled, and pursued a
viewless object across the carpet; from the hearth-rug sounded a
shake, a jingle of a collar and the settling weight of a body
collapsing into repose. {156}

This pleasing anecdote rests on what is called _nautical evidence_,
which, for reasons inexplicable to me, was (in these matters)
distrusted by Sir Walter Scott.





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