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By Peden's Cleuch
The Border hounds had gone right away up Redewater af...

The Ghost Of Peg Alley's Point
Peg Alley's Point is a long and narrow strip of wooded ...

The Pool In The Graveyard
By this corner of the graveyard the red dawn disco...

The Good O'donoghue
In an age so distant that the precise period is un...

Farm House 7 Lawns Grounds Parks And Woods
Having essayed to instruct our agricultural friends in ...

The Rival Ghosts
The good ship sped on her way across the calm Atla...

The Lost Cheque
Mr. A., a barrister, sat up one night to write letters,...

The Benedictine's Voices
My friend, as a lad, was in a strait between the choice...

The Ghostly Adventurer
About thirty years ago, some labouring mechanics met ...

The Frightened Carrier
In October 1813, a little before midnight, as one of ...





The Vigil Of Saint Mark Or Fatal Superstition






Rebecca was the fairest maid
That on the Danube's borders play'd;
And many a handsome nobleman
For her in tilt and tourney ran:
While she, in secret, wished to see
What youth her husband was to be.

Rebecca heard the gossips say,
"Alone, from dusk till midnight, stay
Within the church-porch drear and dark,
Upon the Vigil of St. Mark;
And, lovely maiden, you shall see
What youth your husband is to be."

Rebecca, when the night grew dark,
Upon the Vigil of St. Mark,
Observ'd by Paul, a roguish scout,
Who guess'd the task she went about,
Stepp'd to St. Stephen's church to see
What youth her husband was to be.

Rebecca heard the screech-owl cry,
And saw the black-bat round her fly;
She sat till, wild with fear at last,
Her blood grew cold, her pulse beat fast;
And yet, rash maid, she stopp'd to see
What youth her husband was to be.

Rebecca heard the midnight chime
Ring out the yawning peal of time,
When shrouded Paul, unlucky knave!
Rose, like a spectre from the grave,
And cried--"Fair maiden, come with me,
For I your bridegroom am to be."

Rebecca turned her head aside,
Sent forth a horrid shriek--and died;
While Paul confess'd himself in vain
Rebecca never spoke again.
Ah! little, hapless girl, did she
Think Death her bridegroom was to be.

Rebecca, may thy story long
Instruct the giddy and the young!
Fright not, fond youths, the timid fair:
And you, too, gentle maids, beware;
Nor seek, by dreadful arts, to see
What youths your husbands are to be.





Next: The Floating Wonder Or Female Spectre

Previous: The Unfortunate Priest And Dead Body



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