Informational Site NetworkInformational Site Network
Privacy
 

Home Ghost Stories Categories Authors Books Search

Ghost Stories

In Kropfsberg Keep
To the traveller from Innsbrueck to Munich, up the lo...


...

Rabbitry
A, the doe's hutches, with nest boxes attached. B, hu...

Ben Jonson's Prevision
Ben Jonson told Drummond of Hawthornden that "when...

Group I
We commence this group with stories in which the phenom...

Farm House 4 Tree-planting In The Highway
This is frequently recommended by writers on country em...

Farm Barn 2 Floor Plan
INTERIOR ARRANGEMENT. Entering the large door, (a,) ...

The Dog O' Mause
Account of an apparition that appeared to William Souta...

A Ghost That Will Not Down
(Cincinnati _Enquirer_, Sept. 30, 1884) GRANTSVILLE,...

Jean Bouchon
I was in Orleans a good many years ago. At the time i...





The Vigil Of Saint Mark Or Fatal Superstition






Rebecca was the fairest maid
That on the Danube's borders play'd;
And many a handsome nobleman
For her in tilt and tourney ran:
While she, in secret, wished to see
What youth her husband was to be.

Rebecca heard the gossips say,
"Alone, from dusk till midnight, stay
Within the church-porch drear and dark,
Upon the Vigil of St. Mark;
And, lovely maiden, you shall see
What youth your husband is to be."

Rebecca, when the night grew dark,
Upon the Vigil of St. Mark,
Observ'd by Paul, a roguish scout,
Who guess'd the task she went about,
Stepp'd to St. Stephen's church to see
What youth her husband was to be.

Rebecca heard the screech-owl cry,
And saw the black-bat round her fly;
She sat till, wild with fear at last,
Her blood grew cold, her pulse beat fast;
And yet, rash maid, she stopp'd to see
What youth her husband was to be.

Rebecca heard the midnight chime
Ring out the yawning peal of time,
When shrouded Paul, unlucky knave!
Rose, like a spectre from the grave,
And cried--"Fair maiden, come with me,
For I your bridegroom am to be."

Rebecca turned her head aside,
Sent forth a horrid shriek--and died;
While Paul confess'd himself in vain
Rebecca never spoke again.
Ah! little, hapless girl, did she
Think Death her bridegroom was to be.

Rebecca, may thy story long
Instruct the giddy and the young!
Fright not, fond youths, the timid fair:
And you, too, gentle maids, beware;
Nor seek, by dreadful arts, to see
What youths your husbands are to be.





Next: The Floating Wonder Or Female Spectre

Previous: The Unfortunate Priest And Dead Body



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK