VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.scarystories.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy

Home Ghost Stories Categories Authors Books Search

Ghost Stories

In My Lady's Bedchamber
'Well,' said Harry laughingly, as he showed me the fa...

Ghost Hunters Of Yesterday And To-day
Psychical research, of which so much mention has been...

The Open Door
Here again is something that is very peculiar and not...

The Bloody Footstep
On the threshold of one of the doors of Smithills ...

Southdown Ewe
The Southdown, a cut of which we present, is a fine, co...

The Rattlesnake
Dr. Kinsolving, of the Church of the Epiphany in Philad...

To Prove An Alibi
I first met Arthur Cressley in the late spring of 1892....

An Unfinished Race
James Burne Worson was a shoemaker who lived in Lea...

The Great Amherst Mystery
On 13th February, 1888, Mr. Walter Hubbell, an actor by...

Farm House 7 Flowers
Start not, gentle reader! We are not about to inflict u...





The Restraining Hand






"About twenty years ago," writes Mrs. Elliot, "I received some letters
by post, one of which contained 15 pounds in bank notes. After
reading the letters I went into the kitchen with them in my hands. I
was alone at the time. . . . Having done with the letters, I made an
effort to throw them into the fire, when I distinctly felt my hand
arrested in the act. It was as though another hand were gently laid
upon my own, pressing it back. Much surprised, I looked at my hand
and then saw it contained, not the letters I had intended to destroy,
but the bank notes, and that the letters were in the other hand. I
was so surprised that I called out, 'Who's here?'" {80a}

Nobody will call this "the touch of a vanished hand". Part of Mrs.
Elliot's mind knew what she was about, and started an unreal but
veracious feeling to warn her. We shall come to plenty of Hands not
so readily disposed of.

Next to touch, the sense most apt to be deceived is hearing. Every
one who has listened anxiously for an approaching carriage, has often
heard it come before it came. In the summer of 1896 the writer, with
a lady and another companion, were standing on the veranda at the back
of a house in Dumfriesshire, waiting for a cab to take one of them to
the station. They heard a cab arrive and draw up, went round to the
front of the house, saw the servant open the door and bring out the
luggage, but wheeled vehicle there was none in sound or sight. Yet
all four persons had heard it, probably by dint of expectation.

To hear articulate voices where there are none is extremely common in
madness, {80b} but not very rare, as Mr. Galton shows, among the sane.
When the voices are veracious, give unknown information, they are in
the same case as truthful dreams. I offer a few from the experience,
reported to me by himself, of a man of learning whom I shall call a
Benedictine monk, though that is not his real position in life.





Next: The Benedictine's Voices

Previous: The Vision And The Portrait



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK