Take water and salt. Mix. Annoint Third-eye/Forehead. Focus energy either in mind/paper ect. Picture or place the energy(idea) in Vilotet Flame. This transmutes and sends your wish/idea/energy out into the universe and accomplishes wh... Read more of Concentration at White Magic.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Ghost Stories

The Girl In Pink
The following anecdote was told to myself, a few months...

Cottage 2 Interior Arrangement
PLAN The front door opens into a common living room,...

Shorthorn Bull
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The Benedictine's Voices
My friend, as a lad, was in a strait between the choice...

The Lunatic Apparition
The celebrated historian De Thou had a very singular ...

The Dancing Devil
On 16th November, 1870, Mr. Shchapoff, a Russian squire...

What The Professor Saw
This story is not so painful as the one entitled "_Wh...

In The Blackfriars Wynd
''Twill be a black day for auld Scotland when she cea...

Kotter's Red Circle
Kotter's first vision was detailed by him, on oath...

China Goose
The small brown China goose is another variety which ma...





The Old Family Coach






A distinguished and accomplished country gentleman and politician, of
scientific tastes, was riding in the New Forest, some twelve miles
from the place where he was residing. In a grassy glade he discovered
that he did not very clearly know his way to a country town which he
intended to visit. At this moment, on the other side of some bushes a
carriage drove along, and then came into clear view where there was a
gap in the bushes. Mr. Hyndford saw it perfectly distinctly; it was a
slightly antiquated family carriage, the sides were in that imitation
of wicker work on green panel which was once so common. The coachman
was a respectable family servant, he drove two horses: two old ladies
were in the carriage, one of them wore a hat, the other a bonnet.
They passed, and then Mr. Hyndford, going through the gap in the
bushes, rode after them to ask his way. There was no carriage in
sight, the avenue ended in a cul-de-sac of tangled brake, and there
were no traces of wheels on the grass. Mr. Hyndford rode back to his
original point of view, and looked for any object which could suggest
the illusion of one old-fashioned carriage, one coachman, two horses
and two elderly ladies, one in a hat and one in a bonnet. He looked
in vain--and that is all!

Nobody in his senses would call this appearance a ghostly one. The
name, however, would be applied to the following tale of





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