Three friends check into a motel for the night and the clerk tells them the bill is $30, payable in advance. So, they each pay the clerk $10 and go to their room. A few minutes later, the clerk realizes he has made an error and overcharged the trio... Read more of The Missing Dollar at Free Jokes.caInformational Site Network Informational
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The Roll-call Of The Reef
A. T. QUILLER-COUCH "Yes, sir," said my host, the ...

The Eight-mile Lock
It was in the August of 1889, when I was just arranging...

An "astral Body"
Mr. Sparks and Mr. Cleave, young men of twenty and nine...

Croglin Grange
"Fisher," said the Captain, "may sound a very pleb...

A Dead Finger
I Why the National Gallery should not attract so m...

The Ghostly Warriors Of Worms
The abbot of Ursperg, in his Chronicle, year 1123,...

The Botathen Ghost
The legend of Parson Rudall and the Botathen Ghost...

A Haunted Island
The following events occurred on a small island of is...

'the Foul Fords' Or The Longformacus Farrier
"About 1820 there lived a Farrier of the name of Keane ...

The Old Nurse's Story
I set out one evening for the cottage of my old ...





The Old Family Coach






A distinguished and accomplished country gentleman and politician, of
scientific tastes, was riding in the New Forest, some twelve miles
from the place where he was residing. In a grassy glade he discovered
that he did not very clearly know his way to a country town which he
intended to visit. At this moment, on the other side of some bushes a
carriage drove along, and then came into clear view where there was a
gap in the bushes. Mr. Hyndford saw it perfectly distinctly; it was a
slightly antiquated family carriage, the sides were in that imitation
of wicker work on green panel which was once so common. The coachman
was a respectable family servant, he drove two horses: two old ladies
were in the carriage, one of them wore a hat, the other a bonnet.
They passed, and then Mr. Hyndford, going through the gap in the
bushes, rode after them to ask his way. There was no carriage in
sight, the avenue ended in a cul-de-sac of tangled brake, and there
were no traces of wheels on the grass. Mr. Hyndford rode back to his
original point of view, and looked for any object which could suggest
the illusion of one old-fashioned carriage, one coachman, two horses
and two elderly ladies, one in a hat and one in a bonnet. He looked
in vain--and that is all!

Nobody in his senses would call this appearance a ghostly one. The
name, however, would be applied to the following tale of





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