The face is flushed, the breath has the odor of liquor, the pulse is full and bounding with deep respiration. Reason, memory, judgment and will are first stimulated and then blunted. The drinker's peculiarities are exaggerated, the person becoming ... Read more of ALCOHOLISM. Acute Symptoms at Home Medicine.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Ghost Stories

The Mezzotint
Some time ago I believe I had the pleasure of telling y...

The Credulous Peasants
No longer ago than the year 1788, when the husbandmen...

The Deathbed Of Louis Xiv
"Here is a strange story that the Duc d'Orleans told me...

The Smooth Terrier
Sir Walter Scott, who was a great friend to dogs, as we...

Appearances Of The Dead
We now pass beyond the utmost limits to which a "scient...

The Benighted Traveller And Haunted Room
A gentleman was benighted, while travelling alone, in...

The Great Amherst Mystery
On 13th February, 1888, Mr. Walter Hubbell, an actor by...

The Ducks' Eggs
A little girl of the author's family kept ducks and was...

Lost Hearts
It was, as far as I can ascertain, in September of the ...

The Dying Mother {101}
"Mary, the wife of John Goffe of Rochester, being affli...





The Old Family Coach






A distinguished and accomplished country gentleman and politician, of
scientific tastes, was riding in the New Forest, some twelve miles
from the place where he was residing. In a grassy glade he discovered
that he did not very clearly know his way to a country town which he
intended to visit. At this moment, on the other side of some bushes a
carriage drove along, and then came into clear view where there was a
gap in the bushes. Mr. Hyndford saw it perfectly distinctly; it was a
slightly antiquated family carriage, the sides were in that imitation
of wicker work on green panel which was once so common. The coachman
was a respectable family servant, he drove two horses: two old ladies
were in the carriage, one of them wore a hat, the other a bonnet.
They passed, and then Mr. Hyndford, going through the gap in the
bushes, rode after them to ask his way. There was no carriage in
sight, the avenue ended in a cul-de-sac of tangled brake, and there
were no traces of wheels on the grass. Mr. Hyndford rode back to his
original point of view, and looked for any object which could suggest
the illusion of one old-fashioned carriage, one coachman, two horses
and two elderly ladies, one in a hat and one in a bonnet. He looked
in vain--and that is all!

Nobody in his senses would call this appearance a ghostly one. The
name, however, would be applied to the following tale of





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