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The Devil Of Hjalta-stad {246}
The sheriff writes: "The Devil at Hjalta-stad was outs...

Hong The Currier
"In the time when the Justice of Heaven was actively ...

In The Barn
BY BURGES JOHNSON The moment we had entered the ba...

More Haunted Houses
A physician, as we have seen, got the better of the dem...

My Gillie's Father's Story
Fishing in Sutherland, I had a charming companion in th...

The Signal-man
"Halloa! Below there!" When he heard a voice ...

Position
The site of a dwelling should be an important study wit...

The Woman's Ghost Story
"Yes," she said, from her seat in the dark corner, "...

Two Military Executions
In the spring of the year 1862 General Buell's big ...

The Lost Key
Lady X., after walking in a wood near her house in Irel...





The Old Family Coach






A distinguished and accomplished country gentleman and politician, of
scientific tastes, was riding in the New Forest, some twelve miles
from the place where he was residing. In a grassy glade he discovered
that he did not very clearly know his way to a country town which he
intended to visit. At this moment, on the other side of some bushes a
carriage drove along, and then came into clear view where there was a
gap in the bushes. Mr. Hyndford saw it perfectly distinctly; it was a
slightly antiquated family carriage, the sides were in that imitation
of wicker work on green panel which was once so common. The coachman
was a respectable family servant, he drove two horses: two old ladies
were in the carriage, one of them wore a hat, the other a bonnet.
They passed, and then Mr. Hyndford, going through the gap in the
bushes, rode after them to ask his way. There was no carriage in
sight, the avenue ended in a cul-de-sac of tangled brake, and there
were no traces of wheels on the grass. Mr. Hyndford rode back to his
original point of view, and looked for any object which could suggest
the illusion of one old-fashioned carriage, one coachman, two horses
and two elderly ladies, one in a hat and one in a bonnet. He looked
in vain--and that is all!

Nobody in his senses would call this appearance a ghostly one. The
name, however, would be applied to the following tale of





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Previous: The Deathbed Of Louis Xiv



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