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The Drunken Bucks And Chimney-sweep






On March the 19th, 1765, four bucks assembled at an inn in Grantham, to
drink a glass, and play a game of cards. The glass circulating very
briskly, before midnight they became so intoxicated, that not one of
them was able to determine how the game stood; and several disputes,
interspersed with a considerable number of oaths, ensued, till they
agreed to let the cards lie, and endeavour to drink themselves sober.
Shortly after they resumed the game; and each man imagining himself
capable of directing the rest, they soon came again to very high words;
when the waiter, fearful that some bad consequences might ensue, let
them know it was near three o'clock, and, if any gentleman pleased, he
would wait on him home. Instead of complying with his request, the
geniuses looked upon it as an indignity offered them, and declared, with
the most horrid imprecations, that not one of them would depart till
day-light. But, in the height of their anger, an uncommon noise in the
chimney engaged their attention; when, on looking towards the
fire-place, a black spectre made its appearance, and crying out in a
hollow menacing tone--"My father has sent me for you, infamous
reprobates!" They all, in the greatest fright, flew out of the room,
without staying to take their hats, in broken accents confessing their
sins, and begging for mercy.

It appears, that the master of the inn, finding he could not get rid of
his troublesome guests, and having a chimney-sweeper in his house
sweeping other chimneys, he gave the boy directions to descend into the
room as above related, whilst he stood at a distance, and enjoyed the
droll scene of the bucks' flight.





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